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PBS
Aug 29, 2013 12:00am PDT
for good evening. our conversation on the life and legacy of martin luther king junior. we will talk with two of the three surviving children. martinalways regarded luther king as the greatest american this country has ever and his is a legacy of and prophetice witness. he was a man not willing to settle. you joined us. athe legacy of martin luther king is coming up now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. tavis: we are joined by the director of the king institute. i guess today officially concludes the festivities that have been going on for weeks. what is your sense for how martin has been treated? >> i think it has been great. i think that represents that martin luther king's legacy lives on into the 21st century. >> we have a problem where the majority do not have passports. not get out and see the world. see inside looking out. when one does travel around the world, give me some sense of how is regardedr king around the world. >> you have asked the right question. he is a world figure. he is a symbol for social justice around the world. outsid
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 2:00pm EDT
at how far we've come as a society. 50 years ago when dr. martin luther king with his dream and it seems thoug as though thingsn jeopardy. >> mike, it is not lost on anybody in this room how lucky we are because the umbrellas are out, and you are in the rain. >> reporter: well of course our textcal crew has provided me with an umbrella, and you can't see it. it is raining, and it has been intermittent off and on. a lot of folks here with their rain gear, but part the clichÉ, it has not dampened the spirits here. we just heard a fantastic medley of spiritual songs and a number of speakers. what strikes me is the number of absolute living legendses who are elderly now, people from the past from the long struggle from the heyday of the civil rights movement. i believe the president is on site now. i just saw the press pool that travels with him. he'll be speaking in 40 minutes time as i understood it. we'll hear from two former presidents, two white southerners, as it would have it. it's been a day of part celebration, part renewal. and we have the historic african-american congregat
Univision
Aug 28, 2013 6:30pm PDT
decision. y se cumplen 50 aÑos del discurso de martin luther king. >>> y en mÉxico el hallazgo de la vÍctima nÚmero 13 podrÍa llevar al autor de la masacre del bar heaven. y maduro vuelve a provocar criticas de su pueblo por confundir un pasaje de la biblia. comenzamos. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> este es su "noticiero univisiÓn" con jorge ramos y marÍa elena salinas. ♪ >>> quÉ tal, buenas noches. estarÁn estados unidos y sus aliados al borde de una nueva guerra? todo parece indicar que un ataque castigo contra siria es inminente, pero se consideran factores polÍticos y diplomÁticos, la onu pide mas tiempo para completar investigaciÓn. y el mientras el mundo se pone de acuerdo el pueblo sirio sigue sufriendo por el embate de su gobierno. >>> la violencia en siria no para desde que conocieron las primeras imÁgenes del ataque con armas quÍmicas, estados unidos no tiene dudas que se usÓ armas quÍmicas, los misiles esperan la orden de ataque del presidente obama. son 4 buques con lanzamisiles que atacarÍan puntos estratÉgicos, la misiva podrÍa ser apoyada por aviones bombarder
MSNBC
Aug 25, 2013 8:00am EDT
years ago today, the executive secretary of the naacp roy wilkins and martin luther king jr. both "me press." this was the very first question they were asked. >> there's a great many people who think it's impossible to bring 100,000 negros into washington without incident and possibly riot. what do you see as the effect on the just cause of the negro if you do have any incidence, if you do have any rioting? >> and then the march happened. tens of thousands of people peacefully assembled, kault calling for equality for jobs and action, just like that the tone of the coverage changed. >> every prediction that organizers made that can be tangibly proved has been proved. they said it would be a peaceful, nonviolent march, and it was. >> i want to bring in bob herbert, former "new york times" columnist and distinguished fellow. robert mann, professor at louisiana state university and author of "the walls of jericho," walter fields, now executive editor of northstarnews.com, black public affairs news and website. jack rosin that wi rosenthal, j department aide to robert f. kennedy. tha
Telemundo
Aug 25, 2013 12:00pm PDT
histÓrico discurso de martin luther king junior en washington, dc en donde habla sobre su sueÑo americano, hablamos con su hijo y con su hija. ademÁs que esta pasando con la reforma migratoria en la cÁmara baja, hablamos con dos representantes y el seÑor de los cielos, rafael amaya hoy dÍa en enfoque. >>> hola ¿quÉ tal? muchÍsimas gracias por dejarme ser parte de su 25 de agosto, comenzaron las celebraciones del 50 aniversario del discurso de martin luther king junior, yo tengo un sueÑo, discurso que marcÓ la historia de estados unidos y fue decisivo en el movimiento de derechos civiles del paÍs, organizaciones cÍvicas que luchan por una reforma migratoria consideran que hoy dÍa los latinos luchan por esa igualdad como lo hicieron los afroamericanos hace 50 aÑos y se sumaron a las celebraciones por el histÓrico momento en la naciÓn. lo que trabaja lo que hay que trabajar con la comunidad latina y la comunidad americana. >>> significa que tengo experiencia, significa que el paÍs soÑador como yo y padres y familias que tienen esperanza de algÚn dÍa poner estar juntos con
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 11:00am PDT
back 50 years ago that martin luther king led. jobs. i think that's how the standard is going to be set for his speech tonight. will he promise something really, really big that the republicans will have a hard time saying no to? or will he say no to himself? i think that's the worst possible thing you can do today is say no to himself and hesitate, be too prudent, and not offer a big proposal. otherwise, he's going to end his second term with the unemployment rate roughly the same as the one he inherited. that's not a good record for a democratic president. >> but chris, let me ask you this. the president has been on this jobs tour and talking about his effort to get people back to work. but living in this moment, in this time, we said oprah winfrey is perhaps the personification of dr. king's dream, but we know that the first african-american president is that. regardless of policy or the politics that happens in that tough town that you love so well, the emotion of seeing that is something that cannot be disputed through any fact. it is the reality that he is the first african-am
PBS
Aug 23, 2013 4:00pm PDT
. one photographer shows us the many ways in which martin luther king is portrayed across the u.s.. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and all and around the globe. a big event of grave concern, that is how president obama has described the alleged chemical attack outside of damascus earlier this week. the british foreign secretary has said in no uncertain terms that his government leaves that syrian regime attacked its own people. even russia has joined calls for leading you when inspectors investigate. letting you when .nvestigators in >> treating the injured from the alleged chemical attack in the damascus suburbs. adults and children, frantic medical workers. still unverified, but this new footage is from a syrian filmmaker. more tales of what exactly happened in a small hours of wednesday morning. of myfather, mother, all sisters and brothers come at least 50 neighbors collapse on the floor. i managed to bring my little sisters to the hospital. nothing is left. cars hittingw walls because the drivers lost consciousness as they tried to transport the victim
FOX
Aug 23, 2013 5:30pm EDT
events will be held to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. martin luther king delivered his famous i have a dream speech. from coast-to-coast, there are many murals bearing king's image. one photographer has spent the last 30 years traveling across america to discover how dr. king is portrayed by artists on the street. this is what he found. >> the images bear witness to their tremendous resilience and tremendous popularity of dr. king. while some of the other figures may fall down the wayside. martin luther king is always present. you had martin luther king very often with nelson mandela and with malcolm x. that was very common in the 90's. in los angeles, the company kept company with people like poncho via or cesar chavez. the first thing was the most amazing one, that was in los angeles and that had to do with martin luther king being painted by a commercial painter, sign painters that had actually never painted a black person before. there were also latinos. sometimes, you could only recognize them because they .rote mlk sometimes i would have to knock on the door o
SFGTV
Aug 22, 2013 1:30pm PDT
when i was a student there. martin luther king, jr., was my mentor and jail mate. he taught only one class in his lifetime, and that was at morehouse the semesters of 1961, '62, a seminar in social philosophy. when i sat at his feet, one thing that impressed me most about his lectures was one concept that was advanced by dr. black man at boston university, of personalism. that idea that all persons in this crusted earth are important, are endued with worth and dignity. and in a government of civil society, we should accord all peoples, those services and amenities that will enable them to develop as fully matured persons. unfortunately, friends, because of the dark past of this nation, not too often african americans have experienced receiving those services that should have been ours which are [speaker not understood] and afforded for all american citizens. i wish to say that it's good for us to go back in history sometime and get a perspective. i have here a copy of some copious notes from a meeting that was held in savannah, georgia, january 12th, 1865. a meeting called by general
FOX
Aug 25, 2013 11:00pm PDT
. they marched to the washington mall where the 34-year-old reverend martin luther king jr. already renowned as an author and freedom rights leader was to make the speech of his life. >> i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. >> reporter: the reverend cecil williams of glide memorial church was there. >> i just said, something exciting is really taking place today. because there were just hoards of people. i mean people coming from every direction. and i was so proud to be a part of it. it was -- i had never seen that many people before in my life. it was the forum and the movement and the energy and the commitment and spirit of the people. >> many of them had never stood even in a line where there were black and white people together. you would never know that there was any feeling of hostility or anything. it was such a beautiful spirit that existed that day. >> reporter: martin luther king knew that his speech had to reach out beyond the immediate cro
FOX News
Aug 28, 2013 11:00pm PDT
today, martin luther king junior delivered his legendary dream speech in washington. it was a battle cry for liberty and justice for all. it changed the course of our history. king would have been 84 years old had he lived to this day. he would have been able to witness the nation's first african-american president standing on those same steps he did in 1963. here is president obama commemorating dr. king's dream and his lasting legacy this afternoon. >> on a hot summer day they assembled here in our nation's capital under the shadow of the great emancipator. everyone that realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship, you are marching. that's the lesson of our past. that's the promise of tomorrow. >> okay, bob, you were particularly moved by this speech as you were by dr. king's speech so many years, 50 years ago. >> yeah. i think if dr. king had been alive today, listened to these tributes, i think he would
NBC
Aug 25, 2013 7:00am PDT
history. we'll show you how thousands honored the legacy of dr. martin luther king jr. ahead of the 50th anniversary of his historic "i have a dream" speech. this is today in the bay. >>> good morning to you. and we're looking live at the start of the day in the south bay. a little cloud cover, cooler temperatures. at least for now. thanks for joining us. i'm chrkris sanchez along with anthony slaughter. it was a little warm yesterday for a lot of us. >> today, a little cooler. we have a cold front moving through. that's where we have low clouds, widespread across the area. even the golden gate shrouded with drizzle. that the cold front as we speak. by noon, we'll see sunshine. temperatures up by 3 to 4 degrees. we get close tofiant yesterday, closer to 80 today. again, not all that warm, but we're already starting off balmy. 66 degrees in san jose. 64 in san francisco. that's because of the low clouds and fog keeping things very insulated at the surface. the fog and drizzle is causing hour delays on arriving flights at sfo, and if you're heading to the 49ers game later today, that
Al Jazeera America
Aug 24, 2013 1:00pm EDT
on washington, 50 years later people around the country reflect on martin luther king's dream. >> well to al jazeera, we're just days away from the 50th anniversary of that famous "i have a dream" speech. people are make thinking way to washington, d.c. thousands of people in fact, and our del walters is there talking to people about why it's so important for them to relive history, and how far have we come and how much further do we have to go? >> reporter: hey, richelle, what it is is a day of soaring temperatures and rhetoric on the mall much like it must have been 50 years ago. i watched it at home with my family as did hundreds of thousands african-americans or as we were called back then, negro or colored, and then blacks or african-americans. the crowds stretch from the lincoln memorial down to the moment. which is a distance of a mile. they started coming at 7:00 and they began to trickle to a sea of humanity that is now engaged in a familiar theme, and that is change has to come to washington. change has to come to america. that was the theme echoed some 50 years ago.
FOX News
Aug 28, 2013 1:00pm PDT
. i'm neil cavuto. in 1963 martin luther king wasn't just fighting for racial equality, he was actually fighting for jobs and economic justice. think about it. he died that way. a theme this president is continuing today. to hear america's first african-american governor tell it, we have certainly come a long way, and we have a long way to go. as martin luther king paved the way for an african-american president, this man i guess sort of hit the skids. virginia's former democratic governor with us. governor, it's a real pleasure to have you. >> neil, good to be with you. >> you talk about this sort of weird juxtaposition between looking at the advancement and improvement we've made on things like racial equality, but not when it comes to just economic quality and the president himself mentioned it and said this is something party and generations have done. what is it that we can't budge? first of all, king's dream was based on the opportunity made available for people to live the american dream. consequently, the key at that time for all persons involved with the civil rights l
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 12:30pm EDT
the old negro spiritual declairing the dream of the young martin luther king, jr. 50 years later, the son of that king has called us all together once again to gather at the feet of the great emancipator just wonder from the granite figure of his father and one of our founding fathers. he has called us together not just to celebrate nor merely to commemorate. he has called us to fortify and inknock late our human spirit to galvanize and energyize our collective consciences to take action to realize the dream. he has been an elected leader, the president of a southern christian leader conference, the head of the martin luther king jr. center for nonviolent social change, the founder of realizing the dream. he is a national civil rights champion, a global human rights crusader. he is the father of yo landa renee, the husband of andrew waters, the big brother of dexter and bern niece, the younger brother of the late dwro landa denees. born of cortea scott king and the namesake of dr. martin luther king, jr., ladies and gentlemen, martin luther king iii. five decades ago, my father dr. ma
PBS
Aug 28, 2013 6:30pm PDT
anniversary of martin luther king's famous i >> the united states is marking the 50th anniversary of one of the most famous speeches in modern american history. in 1963, martin luther king made his call in washington for racial equality great >> and barack obama, america's first black president, to lead ceremonies to mark the anniversary. king's speech was to become the rallying cry of an entire generation. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up, live out the true meaning of its creed that we hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal. >> that speech was the culmination of the march on washington ivirights reforms anniversaryrreny underway in th. capital. thousands of marchers have been gathering outside the lincoln memorial, the site of the address. a short time ago, president barack obama and his wife arrived. former president jimmy carter and bill clinton are also on hand. the two other surviving presidents, george bush and george w. bush were all -- were unable to attend. president obama began addressing the crowd a few moments ago. >> we ri
CNN
Aug 24, 2013 7:00am PDT
the march on washington, new civil rights leaders descend on the lincoln memorial where martin luther king, jr. once told us he had a dream. >> come on, let's go! >>> the fast-moving wildfire that has consumed 165 square miles has entered yosemite national park. and having doubled in size in just one day, it's now bearing down on thousands of structures. >>> she was tried, convicted and monday she'll be back in court. now jane velez-mitchell reveals new details about jodi arias that show how a previous boyfriend may have narrowly escaped her clutches. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm brianna kheiler. >> and i'm ivan watson. it's 10:00 p.m. on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. and you're in the cnn newsroom. >> let freedom ring. >> and we begin this hour with history being made again today in the nation's capital. >> that's right. marchers are retracing the landmark 1963 march on washington. it was 50 years ago wednesday that the reverend martin luther king, jr. called for an end to hatred and bigotry in his "i have a dream" speech. >> chris is on the mall. chris, participants are exchanging wor
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 10:00am PDT
theocracy whir watching this commemoration of dr. martin luther king, jr.'s march for jobs and freedom here 50 years ago today. i'm here of course with "hardball" anchor and reporter today chris matthews. chris, we've been listening to the speeches and watching and thinking about what happened here 50 years ago. it resonates for you? >> i have to tell you so far today the best part has been andrew young. andrew young is an older guy. like me, maybe. he brought some joy to the occasion today. i think -- what's remarkable about today, the "new york times" wrote the most extraordinary -- >> it was the best explanation of what the speech itself meant. she wrote about the fact that reverend king was son, the grandson and great-grandson of a baptist preacher. the i have a dream is in response from mahalia jackson. >> and all of that is a continuity going all the way back to the declaration of independence through the proclamation proclam ation -- proclamation emancipation and the sweltering summer of discontent. the poetry of martin luther king. >> the speech started as prose and was an economic
FOX News
Aug 24, 2013 1:00pm EDT
. al sharpton, martin luther king iii, reverend jackson. stay with us. >>> a moan tuesday occasion on beautiful clear day in our nation's capital. right now thousands of people marching from the lincoln memorial to the martin luther king jr. memorial before ending their march at the washington monument. marking 50 years since hundreds of thousands of americans descend order the national mall to hear the reverend dr. martin luther king deliver one of the most famous speeches in american history. some of the thousands in washington were actually there on august 28, 1963. as we take a look at the scenes from 50 years ago and many on hand today who weren't even born yet. all celebrating the great strides america has made on race since the darkest days of the civil rights era. and also acknowledging their there is much more that can and must be done. we will go live to the washington monument in just a few minutes. we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital where president obama has been holding a meeting that could have phonily major implication as he and his national secu
Al Jazeera America
Aug 24, 2013 8:00am EDT
martin luther king's most famous speech, americans descend on the nation's capitol to keep his dream alive. >>> california's wildfire raging out of control and moving further into yosemite national park, the fire so menacing, a state of alert has been declared by governor jar brown. for san francisco, the flames are tearing through acres of pristine woodlands. the fear is that million dollars of people in northern camera could lose their water and power. yosemite is on the eastern side of the state, almost 190 miles from san francisco. but most of the bay area's water and power flow right through that area. kilmany duchardt has more. >> it's the fastest moving wildfire in the west if he hfed the fire itself. at risk, the grid and water supply some 150 miles away. >> it has affected our water and power system. >> reporter: two of three hydroelectric powerhouses that supply energy to this city have been shut down to keep fire fighters safe. the city now getting back-up energy from pacific gas and electric. the 165 square mile fire is a scant four miles from the hechhechi reservoir, a w
Al Jazeera America
Aug 24, 2013 6:00pm EDT
rights and racial equality, where we stand 50 years after martin luther king, jr.'s iva dream spee >> good to have you with us. there may be more evidence of what appears to be a chemical weapons attack last week in damaskas. three hospitals supported by the international humanitarian group say victims started pouring in wednesday exhibiting neuro toxic symptoms. medical staff say they treated 3600 patients in a time span of just three hours of those patients, medics say 355 people died. wednesday night's attack has prompted president obama to discuss potential military options in syria. the new president of the syrian national coalition has called for an international military intervention in syria. the syrian government denies it launched the attack and has released this footage right here. state tv says at this evidence after chemical attack. earlier today we spoke with sophie delaney in new york. she described what medical staff in syria have been seeing. >> the symptom with -- been reported about are symptoms including some blurred vision, some headaches, and in the most sever
FOX News
Aug 24, 2013 9:00am PDT
might have been understandable if martin luther king preached retribution. but he did not do that. some members of the civil rights movement then criticized him for it. malcolm x refused to come to the march on washington. he called it the farce on washington. king, as we all know now was all about nonviolence. listen up. >> one of the things that my father was really trying to say not just 50 years ago but 50 years ago, 49, 48, 47, all the way, 45 when he was as isnated, he was really speaking to us about our humanity. and understanding our interconnectedness and interrelatedness. that is why he talked about sitting down at the table of brotherhood. in other words, us understanding that we are one huge human family. yes, there are a lot of different races but we are a human family. that is why he talked about not judging by the color of the skin but the content of the character. >> reporter: just as interesting as the march itself in 1963, was the anticipation in the city of the march. washington was really a city on edge. a personal aside, i am a native washingtonian. alive and well,
Telemundo
Aug 28, 2013 6:30pm PDT
palabras de martÍn luther king junior pidiendo justicia y cambio. >>> el presidente de venezuela, confunde un pasaje bÍblico que deja a umuchos con la boca abierta igualmente culpable. cuidando cuando envÍa mensajes de texto. la ediciÓn miÉrcoles, comienza ya. >>> noticiero telemundo con joÉe dÍaz-balart y maria celeste arrarÁs. >>> buenas tardes la ciudad de mÉxico, quedÓ hoy totalmente estrangulada, paralizada por una mega marcha de maestros contra la reforma educativa, protestas que han pro fecha cada caos en las principales avenidas de la capital. y que han hecho que cientos de miles de automovilistas se queden varados y muchos ne grgocios reportan pÉrdidas econÓmicas. >>> >>> mÁs de un millÓn y medio de estudiantes estÁn sin maestros, y como explica raÚl torres, algunos padres estÁn teniendo que tomar cartas en el asunto >>> gritos, marchas y protestas. es la imagen diaria de la ciudad de mÉxico. al menos asÍ lo hacen ver la coordinarÁ nacional de trabajadores de la educaciÓn. asÍ lograran dicen, frenar la reforma educativa propuesta por el gobierno. >>> nos afect
Univision
Aug 28, 2013 6:00pm PDT
. >> martín luther king no murió en vano dijo el presidente barack obama, dijo que el congreso cambió y el país cambio. >> en méxico familiares de los 12 jóvenes asesiandos en el bar heaven, dicen que tienen dudas, y pidieron a las autoridades hacer más estudios para encontrar la paz >>hay personas que presentan extensión por dar un nombre en la frontera, para eso deben pedir perdón. >> cuálesson s retos?. >> desafortunadamente están usando estos problemas, si dio información falsa no podrá tener el perdón, no podrá ser investigado el caso. >> quienes califican ?. >> este perdón beneficia a las personas que entraron a estados unidos que son familiares de ciudadanos de acá y si demuestran que sufririan mucho si no le dan la excension. >> estas personas tendrían que salir, van a poder salir de estados unidos teniendo la tranquilidad de que tienen el perdón, ellos van a tener que salir, los invitamos a que estén seguros y que cumplen con los requisitos que sonf atlético familiares . >> buenas tardes diana. >> más adelante más información, ahora llame a los expertos l
KICU
Aug 28, 2013 7:00pm PDT
obama helped celebrate a key moment in our nation's history. his speech that echoed martin luther king junior's speech. >>> things are going to warm up. how warm will it be in your city tomorrow? i'll have the details. . >>> they came by the thousands from every corner of our country, men and women, young and old, blacks who long for freedom, and whites what can no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the segregation of others. >> president obama on the mall today pay be tribute to dr. martin luther king junior and all those who marched 50 years ago. thousands participated in today's celebration, and it not only noted the progress but the ground that yet needs to be traveled. >> bells rang out at the exact hour martin luther king's dream sang out. >> president obama, the nation's first black president, standing exactly where dr. king stood reflecting on the progress and the work that remains. >> no one can match king's brilliant, but the same flame that lit the heart of all who are willing to take the first step for justice. i know that flame remains. >> and other times, focusi
PBS
Aug 28, 2013 4:00pm PDT
carried out the attack. syrian electronic army says it carried out the attack. the march of martin luther king, , was 50 years ago. understanding how our brains develop and function is one of the biggest challenges in medical science. grown aarchers have brain fragment and are hoping it could have huge benefits. our medical correspondent has more. >> this is the closest science has gotten to building a human brain. this shows the layers of the organ. they did not complete an entire organ but rather tiny fragments. they reprogrammed them to form brain cells. that has been done before in a dish, but they went further. they were nourished in a bioreactor and began forming 3-d structures. brains reached a similar a ninef development as week old fetus but were not capable of thought. nonetheless, the research has astounded neuroscientists. >> it is starting to look like your brain and starting to show behaviors of a tiny brain. it is extraordinary. >> how will it help medicine? it will increase our understanding of brain disorders like schizophrenia or autism and may also help test drug treatment. scienti
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 8:00pm PDT
., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sublime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and exuding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the time the reverend spoke having a
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 5:00pm EDT
. that we have today whatsident who understands martin luther king meant when he said, we must rise up from the basement of race and color to the higher ground of content of character. i am glad we have a president who joins with martin luther king in calling upon this nation to rise up and leave the basement of race and color and come to the higher ground of content of character. for a nationayer that is strangely enough continuing to seek to deny rights and restrict read him -- freedom and the right to vote. later, it isyears even stranger that there are men and forces who still seek to restrict our vote and deny our full participation. washingtonme here to to say, we ain't going back. we ain't going back. we have come too far. prayed to hardg, , wept too utterly, bled too profusely, and died too young to let anybody turn back the clock on our turning to justice. [applause] the for the -- thank you for the privilege of sharing these moments with you. i see a man walking out on the stage signaling my time is up. god bless you and god keep you, hang in there. fire it up. fire it up. re
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 7:00am PDT
>>> 50 years after dr. martin luther king told hundreds of thousands he had a dream. the first black president will remember king's live and legacy standing in almost the very same spot at the lincoln memorial as we look at that live right now. president obama will be joined by former presidents clinton and carter and celebrity rights and leaders as well. 50 years after one of the greatest speeches in political history, the president is expected to touch on the very same themes of justice and equality and opportunity. he will praise how far we have come but acknowledge how far we have left to go. perhaps he'll take a page from dr. king's book and transform words we have heard so many times into something unforgettable. "my country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee i sing. land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." >> let freedom ring. the theme for today's event as the president prepares for this speech, he'll also be juggling everything else that is going on around the world. topping that list is syria. it ap
WHUT
Aug 22, 2013 6:00am EDT
celebrara el 50- aniversario de la marcha en washington en donde martin luther king jr. proclamo su famoso discurso "tengo un sueÑo".. organizaciones comunitarias dicen que los derechos migratorios son parte del legado que dejo dicha marcha en 1963... fernando pizarro nos tiene los detalles.. tengo un sueno son las palabras que hizo famosas hace medio siglo el reverendo martin luther king en su marcha a washington exigiendo trabajos y libertad.casi un cuarto de millon de personas asistieron a esa marcha el 28 de agosto de 1963 que para muchos es el momento culminante del movimiento por los derechos civiles de los afro americanosesta lucha la representa en la actualidad la reforma migratoria, dicen organizaciones de derechos civiles.a 50 anos de la marcha, si el dr king estuviera aqui hoy, el reconoceria que la reforma migratoria es 1 de los principales temas de derechos civiles y humanos, y el seria 1 lider en ayudar al congreso a entender la importancia de aprobarla.otros activistas a fa reforma creen que las circunstancias son muy diferentes.en el caso de los afroamericanos, eran
FOX
Aug 28, 2013 6:00pm PDT
actions of dr. martin luther king on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. [ bell ] >> martin luther king's relatives rang a bell oakoing the words let freedom ring from the i have a dream speech. he gave the speech on this day in 1963 after the march that drew 250,000 people. >> america became more free and more fair. not just for african americans but for women and latinos, asians, native americans. for catholics, jews, muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. >> tens of thousands stood in the rain for today's ceremonies that included a wreath laying. ktvu's mike mibach is in oakland where some say there is a lung way to go before martin luther king dream of equality is fulfilled. he has it claims of racial bias when it comes to arrests of young people in oakland. >> reporter: martin luther king taught equality 50 years ago and here we are racial profiling still being discussed across america and today in oakland. >>> there is the sound of students. >> i have a dream. >> the sound of king. >> little black boys and little black girls will join hands with little whi
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 11:00pm PDT
>> up next, a very special edition of chris hayes' show with martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech in its entirety. >>> a question of character. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. the content of his character. remember that great line in martin luther king's speech? remember how he offered the hope that his four little children as he put it would some day be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character? have we reached that day? have we? is that how people of color are judged today? is that how the president of the united states has been judged? by the content of his character? i wish. you may wish. he must wish. barack obama the man has led a remarkable life. he excelled in school. he climbed to the ivy league and made editor of the harvard law review in a blind test that has nothing to do with affirmative action. nothing. he has led an unblemished life, has been a solid faithful husband, a loving caring father to his daughters. his political flaw is that he spends too many evenings with his f
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 5:00pm EDT
>> welcome to al jazeera, i'm tony harris. this is your headlines this hour. the fort hood shooter has been sentenced to death. few hours of deliberations, relatives of victims gave testimony and spoke after the death penalty was announced. hasan was convicted of killing 30 people and wounding others in 2009. he will be taken to forth 11 len worth fire crews in california have seent drone to help battle the frames flames from the rim fire. the drones help find hot spots that wouldn't have been targeted else wise. the california rim fire is now 23% contained. that is up 23% from yesterday. for more in-depth coverage in this news hour we invite you to head over to our web site, that is aljazeera.com. that is aljazeera.com. and leading the web page you can see reporting on obama's speech today, marking the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. inside story is next. >>> 50 years after the march on washington there are lingering challenges to the modern social justice movement and a modern debathe as to how to accomplish dr. king's dream. this is inside story. hello everybody i'm david shuster, it was called a march for jobs and freedom. hundreds of thousands of peaceful protestors gathered on the national mall and ignited a new conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would change? >> there was but i think it had -- that had a lot to do with the expectations of the people of my parents' generation they had of us. and you know, also, a lot of black fathers gone -- were in world war ii and they went to fight for democracy and they came back and still had segregation and a lot of discrimination. so they expected us to be that generation that would change things. but i think if there was one symbol, that we all latched onto, it was the lynching of emma till who was our age at that time. all of my friends in the student nonviolent coordinating committee, sncc, remember his face on the cover of jet magazine and his mother had insisted they not do any cosmetic work on him when he was put in the casket. she said i want the world to see what they did to my boy. and that was after having been lynched, shot in the eye and thrown into the tallahachee river. the bloated body was awful. that became the personification of all the evil that we faced and our parents. >> particularly a teenager, something of your age, it happens to them. >> absolutely. you really touched what was important to us. we were going into our teens. we were his age. if that could happen to him, it could happen to us. >> how concerned is the african american community now about issues of economic injustice and disparities between wealthy and poor as opposed to access issues such as so much of what you were working on in the 60s and 70s. >> very much, incarceration of black fathers who could be locked up. i'm hopefully the obama administration could look at that and hopefully that can change. economic injustices prevail. i think if there is one tremendously -- tremendous area that i'm disappointed in, many black people, unemployed, underemployed, lack access to jobs. and without that you really can't afford to take care of yourself. so many people are homeless or living in homeless shelters and so on. who wouldn't be there if they had a job with a living wage, a livable wage. >> finally, 50 years on from the martin luther king's i have a dream speech, if he were alive today what do you think his reaction would be about the progress that has been made and the challenges that still remain? >> the same thing he said about the civil rights act, in the march on washington speech he said that president kennedy has introduced a civil rights act but mr. president, it doesn't go far enough. and i think he would be pleased that with all the progress that's been made, but i think he would also be very concerned. about the lack of progress in the key areas. >> that was joyce ladner an organizer in the original march on washington. today 50 years later, the modern civil rights movement is different. we spoke with phillip agnew, executive director of the dream defenders, a group he founded as reaction to the trayvon martin killing in florida. >> today, what we've learned before in powerful movements of the people, combining it with the technology that we have today and being really on the ground and working with young people. so we're in the state of florida right now working with college age students and youth teaching them about organizing, teaching them about successful movements of the past and then giving them some on the ground training because we've got some real issues that we've got to confront today. >> this summer, the trayvon martin martin case, the george zimmerman why verdict, that was a big moment for the organization. >> it was. a big moment for the country. what it showed is we do live in the day where the death of a young child whether he be black, white, brown, can be condoned, covered up. what we see is that our laws don't really protect anybody anymore, i think the death of trayvon martin was an alarm clock for a lot of young people because he was just like us. he dressed like us, he talked is like us, he went to the store and bought the same things we would. so it was an opportunity for us to engage in a real discussion about where our country is and then bring young people to the table about where we want to go. >> you take your inspiration from martin luther king in an i have a dream speech but there are clear differences in approaches and tactics from 50 years ago. explain. >> nonviolence is the only way we believe to show a violent system. >> just like martin luther king espoused but that's where the differences end. >> yes, right now we live in an age where dr. martin luther king led from the pulpit. so today i think a lot of our young people what's captured their imagination is music and fashion. and so it's taking that message, and bringing it and democratizing it. we're ready, we're trained, we're disciplined. we have them as a compass. there is room for everybody in the movement but deciding what our futures look like, the biggest challenge is allowing for the forum and young people being at the table. we're tired of being at the back of the bus. >> joining us now is bill fletcher with the american federation of government employees. and myaraki moore. and mark moreal, current president of the national urban league and former mayor of new orleans. start with you. what's the state of the civil rights movement today? >> i think we're not where we were. separate from the white kids down low, drinking from separate fountains, not being able to go into the stores. we're not there but we're not where we ought to be. we have huge disparities in terms of wealth. for every $1 in wealth held by the typical white family, the typical african american family have 5 sengts of welt, we have disparities and challenges, we thought we were beyond the gutting of the civil rights movement of the voting rights act. but here we are today facing the same challenges in terms of the right to vote and so we have got a long way to go. >> and yet what we are hearing hearing mark moreal, to reach young people through music and where they're most comfortable. >> i'm impressed by philip agnew and the dream defenders, from north carolina a and t and sat in on greensboro and the freedom riders and the like. music is a medium, the focus on the disparities that we face and how we fix them. so i think it's a combination. young people and culture has always had an important role in the messages of the movement. much of the message, many of the conscious artists of the 1960s and 70s promoted the ideas of freedom and jobs and those sorts of things. so i am really, really impressed with what the young people down in tallahassee have done on their own motion. >> and in fact bill fletcher, they got a meeting with the governor of florida and talk about the stand your ground and yet they have to be more aggressive enough. >> problem is i don't think there's a civil rights movement, i think it's problematic to frame what we have. what we have right now are several social justice movements one of which is the black freedom movement. there was a civil rights phase of our struggle in the black freedom movement and that phase ended roughly in early '70s. the black freedom movement continues and part of the problem is that we're too nostalgic. we keep looking back to try to resurface different tactics and strategies and analyses. when what we have to be doing is looking forward. what are the challenges? we have to re-set our sights and i think that's what agnew and other people are trying to get at. even if i agree with mark that we have to look at these issues of political and economic justice. >> mark is there too much nostalgia too much pragmatism as opposed to focusing on what we have now? >> like maya, the stories of signs on buses water fountains, seclusion, segregation and the way in which a generation ago, generations ago they demonstrated courage in overcoming is an aspiration. what i do believe is if you -- inspiration, if all you look is look back, recreate, we will not be successful but i do think it's being inspired by the bravery by the ingenuity. when dr. king deployed peaceful nonviolence, resistance and direct action as a strategy, those who had been in front of the civil rights movement b had been lawyers working through courts. his tactics were highly controversial, not widely supported. we look back and believe that the march on washington was universally supported. that is absolutely not the case. so i think it's a combination of looking back for inspiration and a sense of history, but not getting trapped in sort of just looking forward, but looking through the rearview mirror if you will. >> and maya no doubt that the activists of today are inspiring simply because they're choosing activism as opposed to anything else that the young people can be involved with today. >> i think that i would agree with bill that in terms of a solid movement that we're lacking there. are that i think the trayvon martin shooting, the killing of trayvon martin, was a point of reflection and also, a point for which we generated, i think, a lot of interest and activism in young people and people overall. in terms of small movements i think we have to join hands and i think that's the point we need to get to. >> time for a quick break but we will continue this conversation right after this. stay wit with us. >> welcome back to inside story. i'm david shuster in washington. we've been talking about the progress and lack of progress of civil rights. according to where things stand, according to a recent study by pew research, the employment gap has widened since the 1960s. the difference in black and white families was $19,000. now the gap has widened to roughly $27,000. in terms of wealth the average net worth of a black family in 1984 was less than 10% of a white family. now the gap has widened even further. black families earn only 7% of what a white family makes. bill fletcher, maya rockiningmo, and bill fletcher, these income disparities they are widening. who's to blame? >> the system is to blame. this is what, when i hear these speeches from president obama, regardless of his intentions he's putting the blame on black folks. whether it's black fathers, black families, this system is rigged against us. and that's what we need to keep emphasizing. we have to keep emphasizing, particularly for the purposes of reaching young people, that the problem is not them. even if they have problems. the problem is that the way that the system is structured. we've had, and this relates directly to the march on washington. we've had an economic crisis facing black america at least since the late 1950s. randolph and others realized this, which is what led to the call for the original march on washington in 1963. since then we've had a very problematic economic situation for black americans. and by the 1970s with so called deindustrialization the situation has plummeted with the loss of manufacturing jobs. when people talk about the black middle class disappearing, no, there's been a hole that's been created in our cities where the black middle class has been destroyed by the destruction of these various jobs. and this is the discussion that we need to be having. what is the economic strategy to address this? this is not about individual improvement. it's about something is wrong in the way that the system has operated. >> and mark moweral, is there something with president obama not talking about this but talking about the system being broken? >> let's be fair, those are the president's words and then there's the president's proposals. one of the president's proposals that we encouraged was the mairng jobs act which -- american jobs act which includes public service jobs, includes summer jobs, includes a more targeted focus on urban comuments. the truth of the -- communities. the truth of the matter is that that proposal standing alone isn't going to reverse the situation, but if a recalcitrant congress, would see fit to 27 months ago have seen fit to pass that piece of legislation. where i do agree with bill in a big way is the deindustrialization, trade policies, fiscal policies have pushed jobs abroad. finally, people have begun to recognize that when you lose manufacturing jobs, better paying jobs it damaged black working people, and it damaged the work class. transition what's there today has transitioned to the white collar government jobs, state, local and federal government so we've had the double whammy of sequestration and cut backs which have caused layoffs in those sectors. >> is there anything president obama can do in dealing with that but also dealing with the republicans in congress and so many in washington who don't even want to talk about that? >> the president has a lot of power, a lot of administrative power that i think that he hasn't yet explored. and so i think that we need to be talking about you know what's going on with the loss of wealth as a result of the housing crisis. and what the administration has done thus far has not been sufficient to meet the need. so on housing policy there's a way that he can lead by making sure the rite people are in the right position he -- right people are in the right positions, and i think the president has the huge bully pulpit, challenging the states to get rid of their inequitable funding systems that actually underfund and defund many of the school districts where students are color are disproportionately concentrated. i think there are a number of things that the president can do by focusing on his administrative power and his bully pulpit. but i feel that the president has viewed the african american community as something not to be addressed directly. he has been comfortable addressing lgbt issues, women issues, immigration issues. but he is not comfortable addressing the left-behinds, things that need to be drafted for earch americans and civil rights. >> time for a quick break. when we return a look at the next generation of civil rights activists. stay with us. ç] >> founder and president of, founder and president of the national urban league and former mayor of new orleans. maya was talking about the president's lack of comfort dealing with the african american community. do you agree that he seems uncomfortable? >> i think it's difficult for him to speak openly about racial disparities. >> why is that? >> i think there is a concern about backlash of forces in the country and the president's desire to try to navigate a course that does not engender that backlash. these times are different, the president has now been reaffirmed twice. i understand the special burdens that the presidential carries as a pioneer. a pioneer who is being intently watched by all the people all the time. but i do think that at this stage, the march on washington and the president's remarks in connection with the commemoration provide an opportunity, yet another opportunity to more directly address the disparities and those who are locked out and indeed left out. so while i might say i don't agree all the time with how the president has pursued it, as someone who has served in elected office and had to nag gate through difficult mine fields, i have an understanding of the political ca calculus tht he and his advisors have made. >> bill fletcher how would you like to see a second term playout on these particular issues? >> the problem is, i can tell you what i'd like to see happen. the bottom linement is: what are we going to do? i think that was true in the first term. a lot of black folks don't really want to have this discussion. but we gave a pass to this administration. you had to do a dna test before you could criticize president obama. you could -- any time you got close to raising an issue about obama's policies, people would challenge you, as to whether you were legitimate my black, whether you were -- legitimately black, whether you were being fair to the president. we made a fundamental mistake, we should have been on him like white on rice right after the election. power concedes nothing to demand. if african americans had been putting the pressure on the president the way the lgbtq movement did, i'd put a dollar to a doughnut that we'd be having a different discussion right now. but for very understandable reasons, the rabid irrational right wing, many that have been attacking him, many say we can't add criticisms because we would add aid and comfort to the enemy. i think in the next two years we have to insist on changes, particularly to economic development. >> maybe a little less pride that we have an african american president, a little more direction and perhaps even criticism. >> that's right. i think the president's election, two time election was a political and psychic victory for african americans, but the lived conditions of african americans has actually worsened, so we have to be about the focus of advocating for what we believe in and advocating for policies that are going ochange the conditions on the ground. one of those areas is social security. unfortunately, the president has seen fit to play footsy with the are congress people -- >> we'll have that conversation another day. thank you for coming. that's here for me, david shuster. you can send us your thoughts on twitter, or@david shuster. thanks for watching, everybody. national park. and there it is. these are the city lights of san
FOX News
Aug 27, 2013 2:00pm PDT
5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." 50 years ago tomorrow, martin luther king stood on the steps of the lincoln memorial, told the world about his dream. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed. we will will able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men and white men, jews and gentiles, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old negro spiritual, free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> five decades later, the first african-american president will stand on those steps to mark that defining moment of the civil rights movement. president obama will likely note racial progress made in the last 50 years. some people aren't satisfied with the current civil rights leaders in america. here is liberal journalist margaret carlson. >> we've gone from martin luther king to the reverend al sharpton. as a leader as he is trying to be this weekend, it is very d disspiriting. >> probably time for everyone to take crop of where civil rights stands. i asked juan this qu
NBC
Aug 28, 2013 5:30pm PDT
martin luther king jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago today. president obama headlined a chorus of speakers saluting the racial justice that changed this country. a lot more on that in a few minutes. >>> but first, the remmings in this city about a possible military attack against syria as early as this week over its use of chemical weapons. tonight the pentagon says the u.s. military is ready to attack but in an interview this evening president obama says he has not made a decision to order a military strike. and new pressure on the president. the speaker of the house is demanding he make the case for any military action against syria. we want to begin our coverage with nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell in our washington newsroom. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. diplomacy came to a dead end at the united nations when the russians again blocked any action against syria. but tonight the president faces a new political challenge as you mentioned from the republican speaker of the house, asking how a military
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 2:00am EDT
speech ever delivered by martin luther king. >> the clock is now ticking on u.s. military action in syria. a probably strike could come within days. u.s. warships are already in position, and the rest of the world is joining the debate on what kind of action should be taken and when. patty tells us what options president obama is weighing to stop the use of chemical weapo weapons. >> reporter: the president obama administration said they will respond to this, the use of chemical weapons in syria. the goal is not to remove bashir al-assad, but to send him a message. >> it is not our intention t for scream changregime change. >> reporter: many feel a strike is unlikely to shift momentum in syria. >> in terms of shifting the momentum on the ground, it's not likely. target strikes are nor powerful in terms of the signally that they achievish and sending a very strong message that the u.s. of chemical weapons will not be tolerated. >> reporter: many believe the president left himself little choice but to response. this was one year ago. >> a red line for us is we start seeing a whole bun
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 12:00pm EDT
" speech, remembering dr. martin luther king. >>> an army doctor turned killer facing military justice and a jury who will decide if he lives or dies. ♪ >>> we continue to follow the developments that are coming out of syria at this hour. at this hour, that is the syrian ambassador to the united nations addressing the security council there which is meeting to determine what to do next. >> all of the details related to this situation. i am in your hands. >> reporter: do you want the team to find out -- assign responsibility for the incidents? and when did angela kaine request to visit guda? there seems to be some disparity there? they are saying there was a five-day delay. >> mr. angela kaine concluded an agreement with the syrian government with regard to her visit, and the visit was granted. she was granted with her team to to go to the locations where the chemical -- where the allegations of the use of chemical weapons -- are there. so there were -- there were no delay whatsoever, and she was granted access to the locations that she and the other doctor wanted to visit. >>
CBS
Aug 28, 2013 4:00am PDT
luther king jr.'s march on washington. and martin luther king jr.'s historic speech on civil rights. captioning funded by cbs good morning. good to be with you. the obama administration is gearing up for military action against syria, possibly within days. as early as today the u.s. could release an intelligence report directly linking the assad regime to chemical weapons attack against syrian civilians. defense secretary chuck hagel says u.s. forces are ready, and the white house says the goal of the military strike is not regime change. alfonso is live with more. good morning, alfonso. >> in fact, united nations inspectors are back on the search for evidence of a poisonous gas attack outside the syrian capital this morning. at the same time there are four u.s. navy destroyers in position m mediterranean, and they're within range of syrian targets. >> reporter: rebels that may get a boost from western air strikes any day now. washington is rallying international support for action against the assad regime for its alleged use of chemical weapons on its own people. >> it seems to me
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 10:00am EDT
act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slow up. we have a moral obligation to press on because of our love for america and our love for the democratic way of life, we must keep moving. in san francisco in 1956 to the mall in 1963 to america today, dr. king's message endures. we must keep moving. our heritage and our hope. advancing civil or voting rights. within two years after the march, there would be a historic civil rights act and a voting rights act. that is why i think it is very important congress observe this anniversary and what followed. there were signs of progress but not enough. at the time of the march, there were five african-american members at the house of -- today, 43 led by the
CNN
Aug 24, 2013 8:00am PDT
ago, martin luther king, jr. delivered his iconic "i have a dream" speech on the lincoln memorial. our chris is live on the mall. give us an idea of what the clouds a situation is looking like today. >> let me show you, just a beautiful day on the steps of the lincoln memorial. you can look over and see the tens of thousands of people who are lining this waterway as far as you can see, stretching all the way back to the washington monument. following the speeches here, the marchers are going to be walking past the martin luther king, jr. memorial to the monument. we just wanted to ask, what brought you down from new york? i know you were about ten years old 50 years ago during the march. do you think that the organizers then would have looked at the nation today and said, success, failure, or a mix of both? >> i think it would be a mix of both, because as they started out ten years ago, it was so that they could try to make things a little bit better. going forward, we probably did make things better, but now, as we're going with this situation that's going on now, things are tryi
ABC
Aug 29, 2013 12:35am PDT
years ago to share martin luther king jr.'s dream. >>> it is what is painting the town red and purple and every color of the rainbow. it is the color run, and revolutionizing the way we run and stay fit. >>> and there is something for everyone in our reunion round-up. from insync to the vma's to a father and son, we guarantee you from new york city, this is "nightline" with cynthia mcfadden. >>> good evening, when martin luther king jr. stood up to address the nation on the steps of the lincoln memorial, his words did not use the phrase "i have a dream." he had used those words before, but they wanted something different. and then, mahalia jackson said "tell them about the dream." and he said the words that still resonate today. two young african american girls went to the gathering, and had a message. today, they talk about what has changed and what has not. >> ♪ ♪ >> with songs and symbols from the struggle, a new generation of the faithful. >> and we thank the mighty god for giving us a martin luther king, we thank the mighty god who brought us a long way, from disgrace
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